Salmon with Meyer Lemon Salsa

Kaki!  Still on Meyer Lemon Day recipes; they were too good not to share them all!

Like most salsas, this recipe is pretty forgiving.  For example, we reduced the amount of Meyer lemon so that we could use one for the Meyer Lemon Sparklers.  A good decision if ever I’ve made one.

And this isn’t so much a recipe for the salmon part, either.  Truth be told… uh, I don’t know how long or at what temperature we cooked the salmon.  Doh, I know, blogger fail!  But seriously, you can use whatever fish (or chicken! or whatever protein you wish, really) you like, cooked pretty much any way you like.  Just get it cooked through and tasty, and top with this delicious salsa!

bekah on mom's new camera 509

Salmon with Meyer Lemon Salsa

serves 4 generously

adapted from Suzanne Goin

Ingredients

  • 3/4 to 1 lb. salmon, cut into four portions
  • 2 tablespoons finely diced shallot
  • 1 tablespoon Champagne vinegar
  • 1 Meyer Lemon
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 3/4 cup chopped olives
  • 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Pre-heat the oven to 425*F.  Lightly grease a 9×13 dish with oil.  Place the salmon skin-side down in the baking dish.  Season with salt and pepper.  Bake for 20-25 minutes until fish flakes easily with a fork.

While fish is baking, make salsa.  In a small bowl, combine the shallot, Champagne vinegar, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Let sit 5 minutes.

Cut the ends off of the Meyer lemon and discard*.  Cut remaining lemon into 1/4-inch dice (yes, including the remaining peel!).

Slowly whisk the olive oil into the shallot-vinegar mixture; a relatively smooth emulsion should form.  Whisk in the honey, then stir in the Meyer lemon, olives, and parsley.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Serve each portion of fish with a generous topping of salsa.  And a Meyer Lemon Sparkler, if you can.

bekah on mom's new camera 507

Final Meyer Lemon Day recipe coming up soon, Kaki!  Hope you’ve had a lovely week.

–Caitlin

*Or nibble on them to see if the peel being edible is as true as everyone says it is. Hint: it is!  But, the ends still have a lot of pith, even with Meyers, so we want to remove them.

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